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Inside Brigitte Bardot’s House – La Madraque

Brigitte Bardot became a legend at the end of the 50's, embodying the idea of the sex symbol in a disconcertingly natural way. Capitalizing on her success in French films, BB made her first American production in Act of Love (1953), but she continued to make films in France. BB's explosive sexuality took the United States by storm, and the effect she had on millions of American men who had not seen a woman like her in a long, long time–if ever–was electric.

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Brigitte Bardot became a legend at the end of the 50s, embodying the idea of the sex symbol in a disconcertingly natural way. Capitalizing on her success in French films, BB made her first American production in “Act of Love” (1953), but she continued to make films in France. BB’s explosive sexuality took the United States by storm, and the effect she had on millions of American men who had not seen a woman like her in a long, long time–if ever–was electric.

Brigitte Bardot bought La Madrague in 1958. The property, shrouded in bamboo and lavender and pine, had been owned by an old woman, and the main building was unprepossessing – part boathouse, part fisherman’s shack. Bardot brought in water, gas and electricity. La Madrague lay on a dirt road at one end of the Bay of Canoubiers, well off the beaten track-it was all but certain to remain a sanctuary, far from the crowds that would soon engulf the South of France.

The house itself lies beyond the dark blue gate, overlooking the sea. It’s walls are covered with clematis and wisteria.

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